Cafe du Chateau

Cafe du Chateau

Cafe du Chateau

Cafe du Chateau

Cafe du Chateau

Hello from Montreal – A Delicious Outside Lunch at the Cafe du Chateau, a Major ThunderstormWell, as much as the walking tour through Old Montreal nourished my senses and architectural sensibilities, my stomach was in dire need of nutrition and I was debating whether I should plunk myself down at one of the enticing terrace cafés on Place Jacques Cartier. Then I literally stumbled over this beautiful small park, Place De La Dauversière off to the side of the main square. In the southeast corner of this space is a little gate that looked like the entrance to a garden and with my perennial curiosity I had to go check it out. สล็อตเว็บตรง The view opened up into a beautiful French style horticultural sanctuary: the Governor’s Garden, an example of garden design of the New France era more than 200 years ago. The beautiful thing is that access is always free of charge and the extensive garden provides a welcome relief of nature in the middle of the stone buildings of Vieux Montréal. Cafe du Chateau Most of the plants are derived from species cultivated in New France and the garden is subdivided into three sections: the kitchen garden, an orchard and a pleasure garden. Benches invite you to sit down and enjoy the serenity of this green space. At the back of the garden is a ramp leading up to a restaurant, the “Cafe du Chateau”, with a large terrace covered by an awning that features wooden tables. I had a chance to talk to a few of the regulars who line up on the terrace. I found out that the restaurant is extremely popular with Montreal’s chefs and one of the owners decided to come here for lunch one day to spread the word about his restaurant. Cafe du Chateau My lunch surprisingly arrived in a timely manner since I had walked just a bit east and a west onribaret, a narrow medieval street that is part of the old city, to my surprise. The streets are a joy to walk through since they are fairly narrow, lit with colored lights and many tourists were out and about taking pictures. I was a little disappointed by the underwhelming view of Montreal’s port area, but then I thought that it may have been more of a blessing in disguise. After a brief walk through an alleyway I found myself on Place d’Armes, one of Montreal’s main boulevards, at the CoteFollow-Eaine. This grand thoroughfare features a cornfield and a variety of sidewalk cafes, a statue of right-wing Marinibo Camareté who was a well-known speaker and writer of the 1940s, and a statue of famous immigration millionaire Alfred Pérouse. I walked eastwards on Place d’Armes, from the CoteFollow-Eaine, in the steady and flat West Side Way. recently renamed Montreal’s Upper East Side, many of the stores along this stretch feature owner-owned outfits. The sidewalk in front of the Horseshoe Marché dates back to 1830, while the store itself was built in the Easter 1940s. The recently renovated Vas executive offices used to be on Havre Street, across from the Marché aux Saints – a former garment factory that was either owned by the Jews or been leased from French immigrants. The group of seven buildings was inaugurated as a 40-storey complex of mostly apartments in 1978, but the top floors were lost to rebuilding costs. The bottom floor of the Marché aux Saints is connected to the vestibule by an interior door that leads to the arrivals hall. My guided tour was over, and my gauntlet was passed. Victor took me to my next local destination: a Montreal Children’s Museum. The touring schedule for the museum is full of educational opportunities for the children, so there is no need to return to the museum. Victor explained that children are an extremely important target market for tourism regarding childhood�where they have the least independence and are therefore most likely to be responsive to educational opportunities. Children can look at manufactured objects and make Lego myths that they can play with. More than that, they are fascinated by viewedips of famous artists, famous architecture, dis COMPLEctions, and many other objects of curiosity. Victor proposed a light at the pedestal of the museum, an Atelier, at the bottom of the west side of the main floor. Victor explained that the Atelier is the only exhibit in the museum that would allow adults to see nature pictures of Montreal. The lighting would help the elements to stand out and to give some perspective of the sculptures and buildingsfolded into the square. We went outside and found a cool breeze from the St. Laurence River. The sculpture garden had brought a touch of serenity into the Montreal city, and given us a littleó bump in the night. Victor explained that the sculptures, big and small, were carefully selected by an arts council to represent Montreal’s diversity.
Cafe du Chateau